Trade war

Escalating trade tensions between the U.S. and China remain the financial markets’ hottest topic. President Donald Trump seems to be celebrating winning the first battle of this war, saying that “tariffs are working big time” in a Tweet on Sunday. He says that they will enable the U.S. to start reducing the large amount of debt accumulated throughout President Barack Obama’s administration.
A fresh wave of risk aversion swept across financial markets after the United States threatened to impose tariffs on an extra $200 billion worth of Chinese goods. This unfavorable move comes just days after the two countries slapped tit-for-tat tariffs on $34 billion worth of each other’s imports.
U.S. futures are pointing to another higher open on Tuesday, building on Monday’s strong gains and benefiting from an apparent easing in trade tensions between the world’s two largest economies.

A trade truce with China and a sham election in Venezuela is a strong indication that we will continue a path of strong demand and tighter supply in the global oil market.

Global equity markets are likely to remain firmly gripped by geopolitical risk, as escalating tensions over the conflict in Syria weigh heavily on sentiment.
Gold soared yesterday likely based on the escalation of the trade conflict between the U.S. and China, but after several hours the rally was over.
It was an ugly start to the U.S. trading session on Wednesday. The Dow Jones dropped 379 points lower at the open and losses reached 510 points in the first minute of trading.
After staging a strong recovery on Wednesday, U.S. equity markets are poised to open in the green once again on Thursday as investors temporarily shrug off trade war fears.
“So it begins.” This is what King Theoden said right before the Battle of Helm’s Deep in the Lord of the Rings. Fortunately, the army of Uruk-hai doesn’t threaten the kingdom of men. But something else – also dreadful – endangers us. Trade wars.
U.S. President Donald Trump on Thursday spoke positively about a border adjustment tax being pushed by Republicans in Congress as a way to boost exports, but he did not specifically endorse the proposal.